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    Catch us at these upcoming festivals:


    Shamrockfest - March 11th at the RFK Stadium Festival Grounds in Washington DC

    The Atlantic City Beer & Music Festival - March 31 & April 1 at the AC Convention Center in Atlantic City, NJ
  • They Don’t Make Them Like That Anymore – The Irish Senator

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    My Irish father had an interesting way of administering timeouts. The reflection of ones misdeed fell

    into that brief window of time somewhere between finding your hiding place and soiling yourself. This

    was not abuse mind you: no, it was good old fashioned rage, sadly lacking in today’s world of domestic

    fathers. He was an Irishman with an abundant supply of raispaid, torque, or what Cahill called warp

    spasm. We, my family of six, just called it run for cover…run and hide….like Monty Python—runaway,

    runaway.

    Dad was all city in football as a fullback (before face masks), track as shot putter/weight thrower, when

    Irish cops dominated the sport, and baseball as a catcher (they did have face masks). He was a Platoon

    sergeant in WWII, landing at Omaha beach, and, then fighting in the bitter cold of the Battle of the

    Bulge. After the war, he was a long shore man when Cockeyed Dunne ran the docks. He was what they

    used to call “authentically tough,” and we all respected that power of persuasion. No finesse required,

    just the legitimate threat of violence hanging over our actions. For the most part it worked, as pure fear

    and respect usually does. We still made many bone head mistakes that give life that valuable

    perspective.

    I felt sorry for the other kids on our block whose fathers just grew sullen and quiet when their children

    were caught misbehaving with me… how boring! We lived with an Irish werewolf and it was fascinating.

    Of course, his bark was worst then his bite, but he always had our attention, and love! They don’t make

    people like my father anymore, and it is a real shame, because he was a complex, intelligent, and

    wonderful man.

    We all miss him dearly and will until the day we hopefully meet him in … Tir na nOg- Irish Heaven.

     

    So raise a toast up for all the old school Irish fathers that had our ever living attention!

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